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HP CD-ROM Server - Setup for UNIX (R) Networks (NFS)

Introduction
This document describes the setup for UNIX systems on networks using NFS (Network File System) transported over UDP/IP. Examples of procedures for UNIX systems are included. You may need to refer to your system manuals for assistance with specific procedures.
  note:
Assign an IP address to the server before doing any of the procedures in this document. For IP and HTTP installations, see the instructions for IP and HTTP setup (addressed in another document), for setting up client access to the discs and configuring the server using a Web browser, in addition to the following methods in this document.
Client access to discs
The procedures for accessing your HP SureStore CD/DVD-ROM server are similar to accessing any other workstation or file server. Users at workstations on the network use the same procedures to access both types of servers, For easy access to the discs from applications, the server should be “mounted” for each client system. After the server is mounted, the client accesses the server, with its discs (and optionally its configuration) just like any other attached disk drive or networked file server.
The mapping described in this section can be done on one workstation by one administrator or installer first. Then any configuration tasks for the server setup can be done (described later in “Configuring the server”, before setting up all the network clients according to the procedures in this section.
Reference on server file system
Different workstations need different points of access to the server. The network administrator or installer, for example, needs access to configure and monitor the server and to configure access rights. Then, the administrator may want to set up all the clients with access to the discs, bypassing the configuration files stored on the server.
Mount drives
On UNIX systems, the server is accessed using NFS. Mount the server by using the following procedure:
  note:
You will need root privileges to mount the server.
  1. Create a directory for the server: mkdir <directory>
    Example: mkdir /HP cd
  2. Mount the server: mount <IP-address-or-hostname>:/ <directory>
    <IP-address-or-hostname> is the IP address or host name assigned to the server for TCP/IP configuration.
    Example: mount cdserv:/ /HP cd
NFS for PC or Apple Macintosh
The server can also be accessed through third-party NFS software for PC or Apple Macintosh computers. If you run a TCP/IP network, this provides an alternative to Microsoft (R) networking (SMB). Please see the NFS software documentation for instructions on how to mount the server.
Configuring the server
By making configuration changes, you can customize server operation and can set access rights for security.
Configuration tips
Some server configuration changes you might need:
  • Disable workstation access to the server using protocols other than NFS.
  • Restrict user access.
Methods for configuration
This document provides information for some of the configuration options, if they are general needs or relate specifically to UNIX networks.
HP recommends the Web method of configuration if a Web browser and IP and HTTP are available. Text editing is an alternative method.
Disabling access for other protocols
In the Detailed View (from the Quick Setup page), you can switch off all access to the server through other protocols for which you do not set up access restrictions.
You can disable Microsoft networking (SMB) access by using the Windows (SMB) tab and disabling the NetBIOS Protocol Bindings for both NetBEUI and TCP/IP. You can disable NetWare access under the NetWare tab by using the Enable NetWare setting.
  note:
Do not disable Web (HTTP) access. Maintain administrative access to the server using this Web interface.
If you should ever need to disable UNIX access to the server, use the UNIX tab and the Enable NFS setting.
You must restart the server to effect these Detailed View settings.
Access rights
Access restrictions can be set individually for each protocol. If you use other network protocols in addition to NFS, consult additional documents for setup of those protocols. (The default settings in some protocols provide full access rights to all users, so we recommend that you disable all protocols not being used, as described in the previous section. If you do not, a user accessing the server through such a protocol may be given full access rights, regardless of the security configurations in other protocols.)
UNIX/NFS-specific access controls
You may restrict access by means of NFS to users with a certain Group IDs and User IDs (UID). You use standard UNIX commands or your platform-specific tools to set the rights for the mounted files.
Example using standard UNIX commands:
Using the example in Step 2 of the "Mount drives" procedure above, the local mount point is the HP cd directory.
Example:
chown root /HP cd/System
chgrp adm /HP cd/System
chmod 770 /HP cd/System
Result:
Now root (UID 0) and members of the group adm have full rights to the server’s System folder, but no others.
Only the owner and the superuser can change these rights.
Differences from standard NFS servers
In the server’s root file system (containing everything except the discs), you can set all rights and IDs for both directories and files. Uniquely, if a right is not set for a file or directory, the file or directory inherits the rights from the parent directory. Since no files can be created and there are no executable files, the data files will not inherit the executable bit of the directories. In the example above, all directories in the subtree /HP cd/System/ have the rights drwxrwx--- and all files will get the rights -rw-rw----.
For non-writable volumes such as inserted (and archived) discs, only the IDs and rights for the volume’s root is changeable. All files and directories on that volume will get the same IDs and rights.
Example using standard UNIX commands:
Example:
chown cdowner /HP cd/Volumes/MyDisc
chgrp users /HP cd/Volumes/MyDisc
chmod 770 /HP cd/Volumes/MyDisc
Result:
All directories and files on the disc MyDisc have cdowner as owner and users as group. In this example, all directories and files have the rights rwxrwx---.
Authentication of a PC in an NFS environment
PC workstations on a UNIX network can also be authenticated. This requires an authentication server and a Default User ID to be specified on the UNIX (NFS) configuration page under Quick Setup. The two settings are combined in 4 different ways, to obtain the following behavior.
Default User ID
PCNFSD Authentication Server
Result for PCNFSD clients
Example:
-2
0.0.0.0
Clients with user ID and group ID = -2 can be authenticated, but there is no authentication server.
Example:
-2
Example:
192.124.138.99
Clients authenticated by the server get their real user ID and group ID. Clients not authenticated default to the Default User ID.
0
Example:
192.124.138.99
Clients authenticated by the server get their real user ID and group ID. Clients not authenticated will fail.
0
0.0.0.0
All clients will fail.
Server password
To protect the system files, it is important that you change the server password for Web access. For example, users are prompted for the server password when trying to access the Administration and Quick Setup Web page for the first time during a session. Under the Administration tab, click This Server and then click Settings. On the resulting properties page, select the General tab. Change and confirm the password. Click Save. This new password takes effect without restarting the server.
Access by discs or drives
Access restrictions can be set individually for each CD/DVD-ROM drive, for each disc inserted into the drives, and for the server configuration files (in the System folder within the root), and for the volumes as a group (using the Volumes folder).
Set these access rights using the Web browser, under the Administration tab. Click Discs and Drives. In the Discs and file system view, you will see an icon in the Access Rights column for each of the discs and for the root and for the volumes folder. In the Drives view, you will see an icon in the Access Rights column for each CD/DVD-ROM drive.
Click on the Access Rights icon to display the Access Rights properties page for that access point.
By drive
To associate the access sharing and access rights with the drive, for whatever disc is in the drive, rather than the specific disc, click Drive for Use the access rights and properties of the Drive.
Then the disc’s volume name will be changed to the default SCSI name, such as CD-id2lun0. You can change this name using the Name field on this property page. As a result, the icon in the Access Rights column will illustrate the key on top of a drive rather than a disc. (For HP J4150A: If this disc is then archived, the share name will revert to the disc’s volume name.)
You must configure the UNIX export list
Under the Unix Security tab, set up the export list for each folder or volume. To mount an individual disc, or drive, or the root, you must add an entry to the Add list for it.
These changes take effect as soon as you OK each page.

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