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HP Designjet Z6100 Printer Series - Color management guide

What is color?

We see the world around us as steeped in color. Color is in the first instance simply an aspect of how we experience our environment and is therefore subjective. Our color experiences are closely related to brain activity that is triggered by signals that our eyes send to it. These signals undergo a complex and highly interlinked sequence of processing stages that make the relationship between what our eyes emit and what we experience anything but direct. The signals sent by the eye depend on the light-sensitive cells that line the back of our eyes, and they belong to three types, each sensitive to electromagnetic radiation of different physical properties (wavelengths). Such electromagnetic radiation is called light and objects appear to have certain colors because of how the objects interact with light (by emission, reflection, absorption, transmission, scattering, etc.).
Our individual experiences of color are also affected by our previous experiences and memories and by the way in which we put our experiences into language. Finally, environmental factors such as changes in lighting, scene content, or the proximity of other colors also have an effect, which makes the way in which we view a given display or print an essential part of the colors we see. Differences in all these aspects (from physiological differences between people, to differences in their past experiences, memories and linguistic tendencies) can result in people talking about colors differently even in response to the same light reflected from an single object. However, many similarities exist between how individuals experience color. You can make very specific judgments about color that others will also agree with when care is taken in the process. In conclusion we can say that color results from the interaction between light, objects, and a viewer, which makes it a very complex and to a large degree subjective phenomenon.
Figure : Electromagnetic spectrum

Color in the computer world

Color-imaging devices such as printers, displays, projectors, and televisions create colors by using different methods and materials (colorants). Displays, for instance, use colorants that emit red (long wavelength), green (medium wavelength), and blue (short wavelength) light. A white color requires all three colorants and black requires that none of them be used (i.e. that no light be emitted). Devices that use light-emitting colorants are called additive, because the light from them is added together before it enters a viewer’s eyes. Printers, on the other hand, use materials that absorb parts of the light that shines on them. They are called subtractive. Typical prints use cyan (red absorbing), magenta (green absorbing), and yellow (blue absorbing) inks and an additional black ink that absorbs light at all wavelengths. To get white using a printer requires not absorbing any of the light that illuminates a piece of paper and to get black, all of the inks need to be used to absorb all of the light that is present.
To control the output of color imaging devices, the following color spaces are normally used:
  • RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) is the color space typically used for additive devices. A color is represented as a combination of specific quantities of red, green, and blue colorants that create the range of colors (color gamut) in the device.
    note:
    Colors in subtractive devices can also be controlled by using RGB data. Especially when control over the printer’s black ink is unnecessary, this is an efficient option.
  • CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black) is the color space for subtractive devices, such as printers or presses. A color is represented as a combination of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (K) inks, and combinations provide the entire range of colors in the device.
Color spaces are only methods of controlling different color-imaging devices. They do not describe colors directly. The same CMYK values, for example, create different colors when sent to different printers that use different inks and paper types. For example, consider a printer that can use indoor inks or outdoor inks. The printer (hardware) is the same, but it has two different color gamuts due to the different chemistry of the inks (dye-based versus pigmented). Furthermore, they need to work with different paper types, as ink interaction with the paper depends on its chemistry. Thus, the colors resulting from given CMYK values depend on the types of inks and papers that you use with a printer. If this is the case using the same printer, you can easily imagine how different results can be obtained with printers using different technologies and therefore using different ink chemistry.
The same happens with RGB-controlled devices. For example, imagine that two different monitors from the same manufacturer have their white points at 9600 K and 6500 K, respectively. Their colors are going to be different because they will be related to a different white point reference. The situation varies even more among monitors from different manufacturers. To emulate the standard color temperature of the graphic-arts industry, set the white point of your monitor to 5000 K (also called D50).
note:
The white point is the brightest neutral color that a device can reproduce or that is present in an image. The human visual system automatically adapts to the content of an image based on its white point.
An RGB image, such as an image obtained from a digital camera and edited on a monitor, must first be converted to CMYK before printing. Different devices do not give access to the same color gamuts: some colors that can be shown on a display cannot be matched in print, and vice versa. The following figure illustrates how the human eye perceives a larger range of colors than a typical display or printer. It also shows that the color gamuts in two different types of color-imaging devices do not match each other.
Figure : Color gamuts
  1. All colors
  2. Computer monitor gamut
  3. CMYK press gamut
Some color spaces are not device-dependent, but instead represent how a viewer sees colors, such as CIE Lab or CIECAM02. These color spaces are defined by the CIE (Commission Internationale de l’Éclairage). The advantage of these spaces is that if two objects have the same CIELAB values, they look the same when viewed under the same conditions. Values in these spaces can be obtained from measuring the light emitted or reflected by an object.

Color management

Many colors from an RGB-controlled device cannot be reproduced in a CMYK-controlled device, and vice versa. These colors are called “out-of-gamut” colors.
  1. Describe the color behavior of a device as accurately as possible by using an ICC profile. The color behavior of a device can be described by taking various RGB or CMYK combinations, sending them to a device, measuring the resulting output, and expressing it in a device-independent color space (for example, CIE Lab). The resulting relationship is stored in an ICC profile, which is a standard file that translates the color space of a device(CMYK or RGB) to a device-independent color space (for example CIE Lab). The process of generating an ICC profile is called profiling.
  2. Convert colors as effectively as possible by using a Color Management System (CMS). A CMS is software that uses information from ICC profiles to transform the color space of one device (defined by a source profile) into the color space of another device (defined by a destination profile). In this solution, difficulties arise with the colors that exist in the gamut that one device uses and that the other does not use.
The following four settings describe and CMS:
Figure : CMS graphic
  • CMS: Color Management System. The software that converts the color information that is stored in the input image (defined by a source profile) into an output image that has the color space specified by a destination profile. Many different CMSs are on the market: in software programs, in operating systems, and in printing software, including the HP Designjet Z6100 internal RIP.
  • Source profile: a description of the color behavior of the input device
  • Destination profile: a description of the color behavior of the output device
  • Rendering intent: the most difficult challenge in color management is when a color in the source gamut does not correspond directly to a color in the destination gamut. When a perfect match is not possible, choices must be made about how to treat gamut differences. These choices are called rendering intent. There are four different possibilities depending on the final output that you want to achieve.
    • Use Perceptual for the most pleasing final output. It is suitable for photographic content.
    • Use Saturation for vivid final output. It is suitable for business graphics (charts, presentations, and so on), but is not recommended for color matching.
    • Use Relative Colorimetric for press proofing. This rendering intent provides a match for colors that are inside both the source and destination gamuts, and minimizes differences when a match is not possible.
    • Use Absolute Colorimetric for press proofing (like Relative Colorimetric), when you also want to simulate the color of the source’s paper.
The following are the most commonly used device color spaces and profiles:
  • RGB mode:
    • sRGB (sRGB IEC61966-2.1): for images that typically originate from consumer digital cameras and scanners and from the Web
    • Adobe® RGB (1998): for images that typically originate from professional digital cameras
    • Specific RGB device space: for images that are coming from or going to a specific RGB device that has been profiled
  • CMYK mode:
    • SWOP: Specifications for Web Offset Publications, a set of press standards that have been defined for a typical U.S. press and for different types of paper stock
    • ISO 12647-2: a set of press standards that have been defined by the International Standards Organization for different types of paper. Some examples of the definitions include Coated, Uncoated, and so on.
    • Other regional standards: Euroscale, JMPA, Japan Color
    • Specific CMYK device space: for images that are coming from or going to a specific CMYK device that has been profiled. The HP Designjet Z6100 printer can measure itself and generate an CMYK ICC profile, describing its color behavior for the paper that was loaded when it calculated the measurement.

Color and your printer

As a creative professional, predictable and dependable results from your printer are essential to getting your job done. Predictability is a key element of an efficient color workflow. You need prints that match your expectations and that generate neutral grays and correct colors on your selected paper, print-to-print and printer-to-printer. Dependability ensures that every print is free of print-quality defects and ready to use or send to your customer. You save time and effort and avoid wasting ink and paper, and you can meet demanding production schedules with confidence.
HP Designjet Z6100 printers have been engineered with advanced hardware and driver features to ensure predictable and dependable results, and offer dramatic improvements in efficiency and control for your color workflow.

HP Embedded Spectrophotometer

HP Designjet Z6100 printer series revolutionizes professional color workflows by using a built-in spectrophotometer for color calibration and profiling.
A spectrophotometer is a precision instrument that can determine the exact composition of the light that is reflected from a color patch. It splits the reflected light into different wavelength components and measures the strength of each component. The HP Embedded Spectrophotometer is mounted on the printhead carriage.
The HP Designjet Z6100 printers use the spectrophotometer to generate custom ICC profiles automatically for your preferred paper types. It then calibrates the printers to deliver print-to-print and printer-to-printer consistency with less than half the color error of earlier HP Designjets, under all environmental conditions, and even on unknown (not factory-profiled) paper types. A built-in white calibration tile, which is protected by an automatic shutter, ensures reliable measurements that meet international standards.
The printer, color-imaging pipeline, and professional-quality spectrophotometer with GretagMacbeth i1 color technology are integrated with the HP Color Center software for the HP Designjet Z6100. Giving the calibration and profiling processes direct access to the writing system allows precise control of ink levels and color separations for each printed color patch. The automated measurement process eliminates the need to handle the test print, provides repeatable drying times, and allows fast measurements with precise electromechanical positioning of the spectrophotometer over the color patch. This provides unprecedented ease of use and matches or exceeds the performance of more expensive offline, handheld profiling systems.

A summary of the color-management process

To get the accurate and consistent colors that you want, follow these steps for each paper type that you use.
  1. If the printer does not recognize your paper type, add the type to the printer's list of known papers. See Use non-HP paper. Typical users might add a few custom paper types every year.
  2. Color-calibrate the paper type to ensure consistent colors. Perform this calibration when a printer alert recommends this calibration (typically, every few weeks for each paper type you use). In addition, calibrate immediately before a particularly important print job in which color consistency is vital.
  3. Color-profile the paper type to ensure accurate colors. Profiling does not normally need to be repeated; after you have a profile for a particular paper type, you can continue to use it. However, re-profiling does no harm, and some users repeat the profiling process every month to ensure that the profile is up-to-date.
  4. When printing, select the correct color profile for the paper type that you are using.
Paper types that are defined in the printer also have color profiles stored in the printer. However, HP recommends that you calibrate the paper before using it.
If you define a new paper type, the printer automatically leads you through calibration and profiling.
The following diagram shows the operations that the HP Color Center performs, in order.
Figure : Add new paper workflow
note:
You can perform all three operations in sequence, as shown. You can also choose to start with or stop after any of the three operations. However, color calibration is performed automatically after you add a new paper type.

Color calibration

Your printer uses color calibration to produce consistent colors with the specific printheads, inks, and paper type that you are using, and in your particular environmental conditions. After color calibration, you can expect to get identical prints from any two different printers that are situated in different geographical locations.
Calibration should be done in any of the following circumstances:
  • Whenever a printhead is replaced
  • Whenever a new paper type is introduced that has not yet been calibrated with the current set of printheads
  • Whenever a certain amount of printing has been done since the last calibration
  • Whenever the printer has been turned off for a long period of time
  • Whenever the environmental conditions (temperature and humidity) change significantly
The printer usually reminds you with an alert whenever you need to perform color calibration, unless you have disabled the alerts. However, if the environmental conditions change, the printer will not be aware of it.
You can check the color calibration status of the currently loaded paper at any time by selecting the Paper icon, and then selecting View loaded paper, View paper details. The status can be one of the following conditions:
  • Pending: the paper has not been calibrated
    note:
    Whenever you update the printer's firmware, the color calibration status of all papers is reset to PENDING.
  • Recommend: the printer software recommends that you calibrate the printer because it has recognized a condition that might require calibration
  • Obsolete: the paper has been calibrated, but the calibration is now out of date and should be repeated
  • OK: the paper has been calibrated, and the calibration is up to date
  • Disabled: this paper cannot be calibrated
    note:
    Colored papers; glossy canvas; and transparent materials such as translucent bond, clear film, tracing paper; and vellum are not suitable for color calibration.
You can also check the color calibration status by using HP Easy Printer Care (Windows) or HP Printer Utility (Mac OS).
Calibrate a paper type before creating its color profile. Later recalibration does not require a new color profile.
You can start color calibration in the following ways:
  • From the printer alert that recommends calibration
  • From the HP Color Center: select Calibrate Your Printer
  • From the front panel: select the Ink system icon, and then select Image quality maintenance, Calibrate color
After launching calibration, the process is fully automatic and can be performed unattended after you have loaded appropriate paper. The paper must be at least 24 inches wide.
The process takes about 8 minutes and consists of the following steps.
  1. A calibration test chart is printed, which contains patches of each ink that your printer uses.
    Figure : Color calibration test chart
  2. To stabilize the colors, the test chart dries for a period of time that depends on the paper type.
  3. The HP Embedded Spectrophotometer scans and measures the test chart.
  4. The printer uses the measurements to calculate the necessary correction factors for consistent color printing on that paper type. It also calculates the maximum amount of each ink that can be applied to the paper.

Color profiling

note:
Color profiling information applies only to PostScript printers.
Color calibration provides consistent colors, but consistent colors are not necessarily accurate colors.
In order to print accurate colors, convert the color values in your files to the color values that will produce the correct colors when using your printer, your inks, and your paper. An ICC color profile is a description of a printer, ink, and paper combination that contains all the information for these color conversions.
When you have defined and calibrated a new paper type, the printer is ready to create a ICC profile for use with your paper, which allows you to print on it with the best possible color accuracy. Alternatively, if your paper type is already known to the printer, you already have its appropriate ICC profile.

Create your own profile

Create a color profile easily by using the HP Color Center to select Create and Install ICC Profile. The printer prompts for information about the paper, and then creates and installs the new profile automatically.
The process takes about 15 to 20 minutes and consists of the following steps.
  1. A profiling test chart is printed, which contains patches of each ink used in your printer. Unlike a calibration test chart, most of the patches contain combinations of ink.
    Figure : Profiling chart
    note:
    To use a longer drying time, instruct the HP Color Center to create the test chart without creating a profile (Windows: select Print target only; Mac OS: select Print ICC profiling chart). Later, when the chart is completely dry, restart the HP Color Center and request a profile that uses the test chart that you have already created (Windows: select Create ICC profile from a target that has already been printed; Mac OS: select Scan ICC profiling chart and create ICC profile). The scan will begin after the spectrophotometer warms up.
  2. The HP Embedded Spectrophotometer scans and measures the test chart.
  3. The printer uses the measurements to calculate the necessary correction factors for consistent color printing on that paper type. It also calculates the maximum amount of each ink that can be applied to the paper.
  4. The new ICC profile is stored in the correct system folder on your computer, where your software programs can find it.
    The profile is also stored in the printer so other computers that are connected to the same printer can copy it. A profile can be accessed and used as soon as a job is submitted from the Embedded Web Server. HP Easy Printer Care (Windows) or HP Printer Utility (Mac OS) will notify you if your printer has profiles that are not yet stored on your computer.
note:
You might need to quit and restart some programs in order to use a profile that has just been created.

Use a third-party profile

If you have obtained an ICC profile through means other than using the printer’s built-in profiling software (for instance from an Internet download or a third-party profiling software package), you can install it for use with your printer and paper.
note:
You can only import and export CMYK profiles.
The printer needs to know which paper type the profile corresponds to. First select a paper type from the list of papers that the printer recognizes. When selecting a paper type, try to pick one that resembles your actual paper type as closely as possible. The paper type determines the amount of ink that is used and other basic printing parameters, so making a good choice here is fundamental to achieving good results later on. If you find that you cannot obtain satisfactory results with the profile and paper type that you picked, try selecting different types, and use the one that works best.
If the paper that you are using is not listed, or if you cannot find a paper type that resembles yours closely enough, you can define a new type. The printer then calibrates itself for use with that paper, after which you can return to installing the ICC profile.
After you have selected the paper type, browse to the file that contains the ICC profile to use with your printer and paper. Normally, ICC profile file names end in the extension “.icc” (for International Color Consortium) or “.icm” (for Image Color Matching). The profile is stored in the correct system folder on your computer, and in the printer.

Profile your monitor

Also calibrate and profile your monitor (display device), so that the colors you see on the screen relate more closely to those that you see on your prints. You can do this in two ways:
  • Use your operating system. In the HP Color Center, select How To Calibrate Your Display for further information.
  • Use the optional HP Advanced Profiling Solution, which gives more accurate results.

HP Advanced Profiling Solution

HP and X-Rite have worked together to develop the HP Advanced Profiling Solution, powered by GretagMacbeth™ technology, which takes advantage of the spectrophotometer that is built into the printer to provide a revolutionary end-to-end calibrated ICC color workflow.
The HP Advanced Profiling Solution, tailored for HP printers, offers a powerful and automated, yet cost-effective, color-management system with a fully streamlined workflow. This helps you to avoid the cost, hassle, and delay of offline measurement devices. Together, GretagMacbeth and HP provide a new tool that designers, photographers, and other creative professionals can use to generate proofs and photo-quality prints accurately and consistently.
The Advanced Profiling Solution includes the following features:
  • The HP Colorimeter monitor calibrator, with which you can accurately calibrate and profile all of your monitors: LCD, CRT, and laptops
  • An ICC profiling and editing software program that provides additional features and functionality beyond those included in the HP Color Center
Use the Advanced Profiling Solution to perform the following tasks:
  • See matching colors on your screen and printed paper.
  • Edit your color profiles visually for maximum control.
  • Perform all operations easily using a step-by-step software interface - no extra manuals are needed.
  • Generate color profiles for all your paper types, in RGB or CMYK.
The HP Advanced Profiling Solution is fully supported by HP, so you do not need to deal with various support organizations from different companies.

Key features

The HP Advanced Profiling Solution helps you take control of your colors:
  • Calibrate and profile all of your monitors: LCD, CRT, and laptop.
  • Perform an automated CMYK profiling through the HP software drivers to ensure accurate printing
  • Perform an automated CMYK profiling when your printer is driven by a Raster Image Processor (RIP) for accurate digital prints and proofs.
  • Edit your profiles easily and visually for ultimate color control.

Color-management options

The aim of color management is to reproduce colors as accurately as possible on all devices, so that when you print an image, you see very similar colors as when you view the same image on your monitor.
The following are two basic approaches to color management:
  • Application-Managed Colors: your software program converts the colors of your image to the color space of your printer and paper type by using the ICC profile that is embedded in the image and the ICC profile for your printer and paper type.
  • Printer-Managed Colors: your software program sends your image to the printer without any color conversion, and the printer converts the colors to its own color space. The details of this process depend on the graphics language that you are using.
    • PostScript: the PostScript interpreter module inside the printer performs the color conversion by using the profiles that are stored in the printer and the ones that are sent with the PostScript job. This kind of color management is done when you are using the PostScript driver and you specify printer color management, or when you send a PostScript or PDF file directly to the printer through the Embedded Web Server. In either case you have to select the profiles to use as default (in case the job does not specify any) and the rendering intent to apply.
    • Non-Postscript (PCL, RTL, HP-GL/2): the color management is done by using a set of stored color tables. ICC profiles are not used. This method is somewhat less versatile than the previous methods, but is a little simpler and faster, and can produce good results with standard HP paper types. This kind of color management is done when you are using a non-PostScript driver and you specify printer color management, or when you send a non-PostScript file directly to the printer through the Embedded Web Server.
    note:
    The printer can convert only two color spaces to its own color space by using the stored color tables: Adobe RGB and sRGB if you are using Windows, and Adobe RGB and CYMK if you are using Mac OS
You are recommended to consult the HP Knowledge Center at http://www.hp.com/go/knowledge_center/djz6100/ to see how to use the color-management options in your particular software program.
Select Application-Managed Colors and Printer-Managed Colors according to the place you want to establish the setting:
  • In the Windows driver: click the Color tab.
  • In the Mac OS Print dialog box: select the Color Options panel.
  • In some applications: make this selection in the application.

Color adjustment options

The objective of color management is to print accurate colors. Perform color management correctly to print accurate colors withuot manual color adjustments. However, manual adjustments might be useful in the following situations:
  • Your color management is not providing accurate colors
  • You want colors that are subjectively pleasing rather than accurate
You can adjust the colors of your print in similar ways In Windows and Mac OS:
  • In the Windows driver: click the Color tab, and then select Print in color. Make sure that the Advanced Color Adjustments check box is selected, and then click the Settings button.
  • In the Mac OS Print dialog box: select the Color options panel, and then select CMYK Settings.
In either operating system, you can make adjustments by using the black slider and the three color sliders.
Figure : Color sliders
  • Use the black slider to make the entire print lighter or darker.
  • Use the color sliders to fade or emphasize each of the primary colors in the print. The primary colors are red, green, and blue or cyan, magenta, and yellow, depending on the color model that is used in the image.

Perform black point compensation

note:
This option is available only when printing a PostScript, PDF, TIFF, or JPEG job.
The black point compensation option controls whether to adjust for differences in black points when converting colors between color spaces. When this option is selected, the full dynamic range of the source space is mapped into the full dynamic range of the destination space. It can be very useful in preventing blocking shadows when the black point of the source space is darker than that of the destination space. This option is allowed only when the relative colorimetric rendering intent is selected.
Black point compensation can be specified in the following ways:
  • With a Windows PostScript printer driver: click the Color tab, and then select Black point compensation.
  • With a Mac OS printer driver: select the Color Options panel, and then select Black point compensation.
  • Through the Embedded Web Server: select the Submit Job page, and then select Color, Black point compensation.
  • On the front panel: select the Setup icon, and then select Printing preferences, Color options, Black point compensation.

Set the rendering intent

note:
This option is available only when printing a PostScript, PDF, TIFF, or JPEG job.
Rendering intent is one of the settings available when doing a color transformation. Because some of the colors you want to print might not be reproducible by the printer, using the rendering intent allows you to select one of four different ways of handling these out-of-gamut colors.
  • Saturation (graphics): best used for presentation graphics, charts, or images that are made up of bright, saturated colors
  • Perceptual (images): best used for photographs or images in which colors blend together. This setting attempts to preserve the overall color appearance.
  • Relative colorimetric (proofing): best used when you want to match a particular color. This method is mainly used for proofing. It guarantees that if a color can be printed accurately, it will be printed accurately. The other methods provide a more pleasing range of colors but do not guarantee that any particular color will be printed accurately. This option maps the white of the input space to the white of the paper on which you are printing.
  • Absolute colorimetric (proofing): this option is the same as relative colorimetric, but without mapping of the white. This rendering is also used mainly for proofing, where the goal is to simulate the output of one printer (including its white point).
The rendering intent can be specified in the following ways:
  • With a Windows PostScript printer driver: click the Color tab, and then select Rendering intent.
  • With a Mac OS printer driver: select the Color Options panel, and then select Rendering intent.
  • Through the Embedded Web Server: select the Submit Job page, and then select Color, Rendering intent.
  • On the front panel: select the Setup icon, then Printing preferences, Color options, Select rendering intent.

HP Professional PANTONE* Emulation

When you use a named PANTONE* color in an image, your software program normally sends a CMYK or RGB approximation to that color to the printer. However, instead of taking the printer or the paper type into account, the software merely produces a generic approximation of the PANTONE* color, that looks different on different printers and on different papers.
HP Professional PANTONE* Emulation takes into account the characteristics of the printer and the paper type. The results look as similar to the original PANTONE* colors as is possible on a given printer using a given paper type. This technology is designed to produce emulations that are similar to those that prepress professionals establish.
To use HP Professional PANTONE* Emulation, just turn it on.
  • With the Windows PostScript printer driver: click the Color tab, and then select HP Professional PANTONE Emulation.
  • With a Mac OS printer driver: select the Color Options panel, and then selectHP Professional PANTONE Emulation.
  • Through the Embedded Web Server: select the Submit Job page, and then select Color, HP Professional PANTONE Emulation.
  • On the front panel: select the Setup icon, and then select Printing preferences, Color options, Black point compensation.
note:
HP Professional PANTONE* Emulation is available only when printing a PostScript or PDF job.
You can also use the Embedded Web Server to print a swatch book that shows emulations of PANTONE* colors from your printer, along with a measure of the color difference (ΔE) between each emulation and the original PANTONE* spot color. HP Professional PANTONE* Emulation not only provides the closest match that can be achieved on your printer; but also provides clear information about how close the emulation is to the original spot color.
To print a swatch book, click the Embedded Web Server Main tab, and then select HP Professional PANTONE* Emulation. Select the PANTONE* stock to emulate, and then select the PANTONE* colors that you want to print. When you have selected all the colors that you want, click the Print button.
Figure : PANTONE swatch

Color emulation modes

If you want to print a particular print job and to see approximately the same colors that you would get from printing the same job on a different HP Designjet series printer, use the printer's emulation mode.
note:
Color emulations do not apply to TIFF and JPEG jobs.
  • In the Windows driver: click the Color tab, select Printer Managed Colors, and then select Printer Emulation from the Source profile drop-down menu. Then select from the Emulated printer drop-down menu.
  • In the Mac OS Print dialog box: select the Color Options panel, and then select Printer Emulation. Then select from the Emulated printer drop-down menu.
  • On the front panel: select the Setup icon, and then select Printing preferences, Color options, Emulate Printer.
  • Through the Embedded Web Server: select the Submit Job page, and then Job settings, Advanced settings, Color, Color management and the desired emulation mode.
You can emulate the following printers:
  • HP Designjet 1050c Plus
  • HP Designjet 1055cm Plus
  • HP Designjet 5500 UV series
  • HP Designjet 5500 Dye series
The following table shows approved combinations of print-quality settings and papers for the best printer-emulation results.
Best
Normal
Normal-Fast
Fast
HP Premium Instant-Dry Gloss Photo Paper
Yes
Yes
No
No
HP Universal Instant-Dry Photo Gloss
Yes
Yes
No
No
HP Heavyweight Coated Paper
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
HP Coated Paper
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
HP Bright White Inkjet Bond Paper
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
note:
The HP Designjet 5500 UV printer series does not support HP Bright White Inkjet Bond Paper.
The HP Designjet 1050c Plus and HP Designjet 1055cm Plus printer series do not support HP Premium Instant-Dry Gloss Photo Paper or HP Universal Instant-Dry Photo Gloss Paper.

CMYK color emulation

All CMYK emulation options apply to PDF, PostScript, TIFF, and JPEG files only.
A traditional workflow defines color in the CMYK space. For best results, the colors must be adjusted to the printer, because different printers will produce different colors from the same CMYK data. If the image file that you are printing was not created specifically for your HP Designjet Z6100 printer, it will require some readjustment, which can be done using one of the following options provided with your printer:
  • U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) 2 uses specifications that are designed to produce quality separations that use U.S. inks under the following printing conditions: 300% total area of ink coverage, negative plate, coated publication-grade stock.
  • U.S. Web Uncoated 2 uses specifications that are designed to produce quality separations that use U.S. inks under the following printing conditions: 260% total area of ink coverage, negative plate, uncoated white offset stock.
  • U.S. Sheetfed Coated 2 uses specifications that are designed to produce quality separations that use U.S. inks under the following printing conditions: 350% total area of ink coverage, negative plate, bright white offset stock.
  • U.S. Sheetfed Uncoated 2 uses specifications that are designed to produce quality separations that use U.S. inks under the following printing conditions: 260% total area of ink coverage, negative plate, uncoated white offset stock.
  • Euroscale Coated 2 uses specifications that are designed to produce quality separations that use Euroscale inks under the following printing conditions: 350% total area of ink coverage, positive plate, bright white coated stock
  • Euroscale Uncoated 2 uses specifications that are designed to produce quality separations that use Euroscale inks under the following printing conditions: 260% total area of ink coverage, positive plate, uncoated white offset stock.
  • Europe ISO Coated FOGRA27 uses the FOGRA27 press characterization. It is designed to produce quality separations for standard ISO printing using: 350% total ink coverage, positive film and coated paper"
  • HP CMYK Plus: a set of HP proprietary re-rendering rules that produce a good result for most digital commercial printing jobs by expanding the reduced gamut of your press into the wider gamut of your printer.
  • JMPA: Japanese standard for offset press
  • Photoshop 4 Default CMYK
  • Photoshop 5 Default CMYK
  • Japan Color 2001 Coated uses the Japan Color 2001 specification for type 3 (coated) paper. It is designed to produce quality separations by using 350% total ink coverage, positive film, and coated paper.
  • Japan Color 2001 Uncoated uses the Japan Color 2001 specification for type 4 (uncoated) paper. It is designed to produce quality separations by using 310% total ink coverage, positive film, and uncoated paper.
  • Japan Web Coated (Ad) uses specifications that are developed by the Japan Magazine Publisher Association for digital proofing of images in the Japanese magazine and advertising market.
  • Japan Color 2002 Newspaper uses the Japan Color 2002 for Newspapers specification. It is designed to produce quality separations using: 240% total ink coverage, positive film and standard newsprint paper"
  • Toyo is designed to produce quality separations for Toyo printing presses.
  • DIC is designed to produce quality separations for Dainippon Ink Company printing presses.
  • Other HP Designjet printers can be emulated.
  • None (Native): no emulation, for use when the software or operating system complete the color conversion. Therefore, the data arrives at the printer already color–managed
note:
These options have no effect if the software defines its own CMYK space, known as calibrated CMYK or CIEBasedDEFG in PostScript terminology.

RGB color emulation

These options apply to PDF, PostScript, TIFF, and JPEG files. For HP-GL/2 and RTL files, only sRGB and AdobeRGB are supported.
If you want to print an RGB image, it must be converted to CMYK data. You might be able to do the conversion in the software or operating system. To perform this conversion on the printer, use the following color profiles:
  • None (Native): no emulation. The printer uses its default internal conversion from RGB to CMYK, without following any color standard. This does not imply that results will be bad.
  • sRGB IEC61966-2.1 emulates the characteristics of the average PC monitor. This standard space is endorsed by many hardware and software manufacturers, and is becoming the default color space for many scanners, printers, and software programs.
  • ColorMatch RGB emulates the native color space of Radius Pressview monitors. This space provides a smaller gamut alternative to Adobe RGB (1998) for print-production work.
  • Apple RGB emulates the characteristics of the average Apple monitor, and is used by a variety of desktop publishing applications. Use this space for files that you plan to display on Apple monitors, or for working with old desktop publishing files.
  • Adobe RGB (1998) provides a fairly large gamut of RGB colors. Use this space if you need to do print-production work that includes a broad range of colors.