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HP Designjet H35000, H45000 and ColorSpan 5400uv Series Printers - Moderating Heat Output from the UV Lamps

Document Overview
The UV lamps emit considerable heat during operation, which can cause some media to change shape (bow), possibly leading to headrubs on the media by the carriage or other output defects. This Knowledgebase article describes techniques to reduce the overall heat transfer to the media while printing.
Head Height Above Media
Changing the head height above the media does not affect the heat output from the lamps, but it may be all that is required to clear the media as it deforms and continue printing. This solution has the smallest possible impact on the related settings described below, but can have an impact on the amount of overspray visible in the output.
Lamp Power
The UV lamps have three available power settings: low, medium, and high. In addition to increasing the UV energy output, the higher power modes also increase heat output. Use the lowest power setting necessary to achieve adequate curing of the ink.
Print Speed
The printer has a number of print modes, resolutions, and options that affect the speed of the carriage as it passes over the media and/or the rate at which the media passes through the printer. The longer that any particular portion of the media remains within the print zone, the more heat it will accumulate through exposure to the lamps. Use the fastest print mode configuration that still achieves the desired quality level.
Shutter Angle
When configuring the print mode, the last screen in the series allows you to adjust the shutter angle. Both left and right lamps can be partially shuttered, or one lamp can be shuttered completely (closed). Shuttering the lamps blocks a significant amount of the heat generated by the bulb. When the bulb has low use (0-300 hours), enough UV light energy will still pass through to cure the ink, even when shuttered to the maximum extent without fully closing. As bulbs age beyond 300 hours, low power combined with maximum shutter closure may not be sufficient for all circumstances (ink coverage, media type, print mode, etc.).
The images below show the shutters in fully open, partially closed, and fully closed positions.
Figure : Shutter fully open
Figure : Shutter partially closed
In the control panel image below, both lamps have been configured to an aperture of 40 degrees, which is the maximum shutter angle without being fully closed. This configuration is recommended for heat-sensitive media such as fluted polypropylene (e.g., Coroplast™) or polystyrene-faced foam board.
Figure : Shutter fully closed
Figure : Control Panel: Setting Lamp Angle
Using a Printing Delay
When the all of the above configurations still heat the media to the point of deformation, the last resort is to introduce a printing delay. A printing delay pauses the carriage momentarily after each print swath, allowing heat to dissipate from the media before the next swath. The print delay can be configured from as little as 0.5 seconds to as much as 15.0 seconds. It goes without saying that a print delay reduces overall throughput (square feet/meters per hour).
The printing delay is configured through the control panel in the "Settings | Printing Delay" menu or through the Media Wizard.

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