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    Information regarding recent vulnerabilities

    HP is aware of the recent class of vulnerabilities referred to as “speculative execution side-channel attacks”. HP has released a security bulletin for systems with Intel x86 processor, and will continue to provide more information on other processors (ARM, AMD) as it becomes available. 

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HP LaserJet M3027 and M3035 MFP - Media considerations

Envelopes
Envelope construction is critical. Envelope fold lines can vary considerably, not only between manufacturers, but also within a box from the same manufacturer. Successful printing on envelopes depends upon the quality of the envelopes. When selecting envelopes, consider the following components:
  • Weight: The weight of the envelope paper should not exceed 105 g/m2 (28 lb) or jamming might occur.
  • Construction: Prior to printing, envelopes should lie flat with less than 5 mm (0.2 in) curl, and should not contain air.
  • Condition: Envelopes should not be wrinkled, nicked, or otherwise damaged.
  • Temperature: You should use envelopes that are compatible with the heat and pressure of the product.
  • Size: You should use only envelopes within the following size ranges.
    • Minimum: 76 x 127 mm (3 x 5 in)
    • Maximum: 216 x 356 mm (8.5 x 14 in)
  caution:
To avoid damaging the device, use only envelopes recommended for laser printers. To prevent serious jams, always use tray 1 to print envelopes and always use the rear output bin. Never print on the same envelope more than once.
Envelopes with double side seams
Double side-seam construction has vertical seams at both ends of the envelope rather than diagonal seams. This style might be more likely to wrinkle. Be sure the seam extends all the way to the corner of the envelope as illustrated below.
1
Acceptable envelope construction
2
Unacceptable envelope construction
Envelopes with adhesive strips or flaps
Envelopes with a peel-off adhesive strip or with more than one flap that folds over to seal must use adhesives compatible with the heat and pressure in the product. The extra flaps and strips might cause wrinkling, creasing, or even jams and might even damage the fuser.
Envelope margins
The following gives typical address margins for a commercial #10 or DL envelope.
Type of address
Top margin
Left margin
Return address
15 mm (0.6 in)
15 mm (0.6 in)
Delivery address
51 mm (2 in)
89 mm (3.5 in)
  note:
For the best print quality, position margins no closer than 15 mm (0.6 in) from the edges of the envelope. Avoid printing over the area where the envelope seams meet.
Envelope storage
Proper storage of envelopes helps contribute to print quality. Envelopes should be stored flat. If air is trapped in an envelope, creating an air bubble, then the envelope might wrinkle during printing.
Labels
  caution:
To avoid damaging the device, use only labels recommended for laser printers. To prevent serious jams, always use tray 1 to print labels and always use the rear output bin. Never print on the same sheet of labels more than once or print on a partial sheet of labels.
Label construction
When selecting labels, consider the quality of each component:
  • Adhesives: The adhesive material should be stable at 200°C (392°F), which is the product fusing temperature.
  • Arrangement: Only use labels with no exposed backing between them. Labels can peel off sheets with spaces between the labels, causing serious jams.
  • Curl: Prior to printing, labels must lie flat with no more than 5 mm (0.2 in) of curl in any direction.
  • Condition: Do not use labels with wrinkles, bubbles, or other indications of separation.
Transparencies
Transparencies used in the product must be able to withstand 200°C (392°F), which is the product fusing temperature.
  caution:
To avoid damaging the product, use only transparencies recommended for laser printers. To prevent serious jams, always use tray 1 to print transparencies and always use the rear output bin. Never print on the same transparency more than once or print on a partial transparency.
  note:
Choose transparencies in the printer driver.
Card stock and heavy media
You can print many types of card stock from the input tray, including index cards and postcards. Some card stock performs better than others because its construction is better suited for feeding through a laser printer.
For optimum performance, do not use paper heavier than 199 g/m253 lb. Paper that is too heavy might cause misfeeds, stacking problems, jams, poor toner fusing, poor print quality, or excessive mechanical wear.
  note:
You might be able to print on heavier paper if you do not fill the input tray to capacity and if you use paper with a smoothness rating of 100-180 Sheffield.
In either the software program or the printer driver, select Heavy (106 g/m2 to 163 g/m2; 28- to 43-lb bond) or Cardstock (135 g/m2 to 216 g/m2; 50- to 80-lb cover) as the media type, or print from a tray that is configured for heavy paper. Because this setting affects all print jobs, it is important to return the product back to its original settings after the job has printed.
Card stock construction
  • Smoothness: 135-157 g/m236-42 lb card stock should have a smoothness rating of 100-180 Sheffield. 60-135 g/m216-36 lb card stock should have a smoothness rating of 100-250 Sheffield.
  • Construction: Card stock should lie flat with less than 5 mm0.2 inch of curl.
  • Condition: Make sure that the card stock is not wrinkled, nicked, or otherwise damaged.
Card stock guidelines
  • Set margins at least 2 mm0.08 inch away from the edges.
  • Use tray 1 for card stock (135 g/m2 to 216 g/m2; 50- to 80-lb cover).
  caution:
To avoid damaging the device, use only card stock recommended for laser printers. To prevent serious jams, always use tray 1 to print on card stock and always use the rear output bin.
Letterhead and preprinted forms
Letterhead is premium paper that often has a watermark, sometimes uses cotton fiber, and is available in a wide range of colors and finishes with matching envelopes. Preprinted forms can be made of a broad spectrum of paper types ranging from recycled to premium.
Many manufacturers now design these grades of paper with properties optimized for laser printing and advertise the paper as laser compatible or laser guaranteed. Some of the rougher surface finishes, such as cockle, laid, or linen, might require the special fuser modes that are available on some printer models to achieve adequate toner adhesion.
  note:
Some page-to-page variation is normal when printing with laser printers. This variation cannot be observed when printing on plain paper. However, this variation is obvious when printing on preprinted forms because the lines and boxes are already placed on the page.
To avoid problems when using preprinted forms, embossed paper, and letterhead, observe the following guidelines:
  • Avoid using low-temperature inks (the kind used with some types of thermography).
  • Use preprinted forms and letterhead paper that have been printed by offset lithography or engraving.
  • Use forms that have been created with heat-resistant inks that will not melt, vaporize, or release emissions when heated to 200°C392°F for 0.1 second. Typically, oxidation-set or oil-based inks meet this requirement.
  • When the form is preprinted, be careful not to change the moisture content of the paper, and do not use materials that change the paper's electrical or handling properties. Seal the forms in moisture-proof wrap to prevent moisture changes during storage.
  • Avoid processing preprinted forms that have a finish or coating.
  • Avoid using heavily embossed or raised-letterhead papers.
  • Avoid papers that have heavily textured surfaces.
  • Avoid using offset powders or other materials that prevent printed forms from sticking together.
  note:
To print a single-page cover letter on letterhead, followed by a multiple-page document, feed the letterhead face up in tray 1, and load the standard paper in tray 2. The device automatically prints from tray 1 first.
Select the correct fuser mode
The device automatically adjusts the fuser mode based on the media type to which the tray is set. For example, heavy paper, such as card stock, might need a higher fuser-mode setting in order to make the toner adhere better to the page, but transparencies need a lower fuser-mode setting to avoid damage to the device. The default setting generally provides the best performance for most print-media types.
The fuser mode can be changed only if the media type has been set for the tray that you are using. After the media type has been set for the tray, then the fuser mode for that type can be changed on the Administration menu in the Print Quality submenu at the device control panel.
  note:
Using the High 1 or High 2 fuser mode setting improves the ability of the toner to adhere to paper, but it might cause other problems, such as excessive curl. The device might print at a slower speed when the fuser mode is set to High 1 or High 2. The table below describes the ideal fuser mode setting for supported media types.
Media type
Fuser mode setting
Plain
Normal
Preprinted
Normal
Letterhead
Normal
Transparency
Low 2
Prepunched
Normal
Labels
Normal
Bond
Normal
Recycled
Normal
Color
Normal
Light
Low 1
Card stock
Normal
Rough
High 1
Envelope
Normal
To reset the fuser modes to the default settings, touch the Administration menu at the device control panel. Touch Print Quality, touch Fuser Modes, and then touch Restore Modes.

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