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HP CD-ROM Server - Setup for IP Networks and HTTP

Introduction
If you are running TCP/IP on your network, this document describes the basic procedures for getting access to the discs from the client workstations, for both required and optional configuration for IP network, and for access control related to IP. In addition, any workstations running HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol) over TCP/IP can use a Web browser to most easily access discs and to do any configuration you need for the HP CD/DVD-ROM server.
Many workstations are running other client and transport protocols in addition to TCP/IP, such as Microsoft (R) networking, Novell NetWare products, and NFS (these are addressed in other documents). We recommend that you perform the additional protocol-specific procedures, such as mapping drives (mounting) for easy client usage of CD-ROM and DVD-ROM information.
Set the IP address for the server
Required procedure
Before you can configure and use the server in the TCP/IP environment, you must cause an available Internet Protocol (IP) address to be assigned to the server. On some systems, you also may need a unique host name to associate with the IP address. This section provides these procedures.
Before you begin
  • Confirm with the network administrator that you may proceed with network configuration.
  • Obtain an unused IP address from the network administrator.
     note:
    Do not use the factory-default IP address (192.0.0.192) when installing the server. Do not assign an IP address before consulting the network administrator.
  • If Using DNS or WINS Host Names: Obtain the unique host name from the network administrator. Then associate it with the HP CD/DVD-ROM server’s IP address on your DNS server, using the appropriate procedures for your server. Consult your network administrator or your system manuals.
     note:
    If you intend to use WINS, you must enable WINS when you configure your server later.
  • Note the LAN hardware address (MAC address) printed on the LAN Address label attached to the server or (top of) the tower. The address is in the form of twelve hexadecimal digits, such as 0060B0hhhhhh (where h is a hexadecimal digit).
  • Verify that the server is powered up and connected to the network.
  • To use a UNIX (R) system to do one of the procedures in this section, obtain root privileges.
  • To use Windows NT or UNIX to do a DHCP or BOOTP procedure in this section, obtain administrator privileges.
Methods for assigning the IP address
In this section the methods are summarized, and then each specific procedure is given. The methods available to you for assigning the IP address to the server depend on your network operating system. Descriptions of each method state which operating systems can use the method.
Choice of manual methods
  • ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is the easiest method to use on supported systems--Windows NT and UNIX. It requires that the IP address is sent to each new device individually. ARP is not routable; the workstation from which the configuration is made must be located on the same network segment as the server.
  • Editing and saving the config.ini file for the server is a method usable in any Microsoft Windows or Novell NetWare environment. It requires precision in editing the text of the file, however.
Choice of automated methods
  • RARP (Reverse Address Resolution Protocol) downloads the IP address to each device automatically. It requires a RARP daemon on your system. RARP operates within a single network segment only. RARP can be implemented by using UNIX.
  • BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) is similar to RARP, but operates on the entire network. It requires a BOOTP daemon on your system. BOOTP can be implemented by using UNIX or Windows NT’s DHCP server.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) allows for the automatic but temporary assignment of IP addresses from a predefined pool of addresses. Note that this address may change and disrupt users. In the absence of either an active RARP or BOOTP daemon running on the host DHCP, when enabled, will cause the selected host to automatically allocate and download a free IP address, a default gateway (router) address, and a subnet mask to the requesting HP CD/DVD-ROM server. It also sets how long the IP addresses will remain valid. DHCP can be implemented by using UNIX or Windows NT.
     note:
    Only one of the RARP, BOOTP, or DHCP methods should be enabled on a network at the same time. If both a BOOTP and a DHCP server on the network provide an IP address, then the BOOTP address is used. If both a RARP and a BOOTP or DHCP server provides an IP address at the same time, the results are undefined.
Windows 95, 98, and NT using ARP
  1. To assign the IP address in Windows 95, 98, or NT by using the ARP command, first access the DOS prompt window.
     note:
    Windows 95 only: Due to a Windows 95 TCP/IP issue, a Windows 95 workstation needs an existing entry in its ARP cache table. You can check to see if there are any entries by executing a ping command to a valid address on your network, such as your default gateway.
  2. Perform the ARP and ping commands shown below.
     note:
    The <LAN-address> can be found on the LAN address label on the tower (top) or server; each pair of digits must be separated by a hyphen.
    Format:
    arp -s <IP-address> <LAN-address>
    ping <IP-address>
    Example:
    arp -s 192.124.138.80 00-60-b0-11-00-86 ping 192.124.138.80
    The host returns “Request Timed Out” messages and “Reply from 192.124.138.80…”, indicating that the address has been set and that communication with the server is established.
     note:
    When you execute the ping command for the first time, the response time may be longer than usual. The ping command enables the server to assign itself the address. You may set (and change) the IP address using this method only in the approximately one-half hour immediately following startup in the factory-default state. This inhibits accidental or unauthorized IP address changes after this period.
  3. Restart the server (cycle its power).
UNIX, using ARP
  1. To assign the IP address in UNIX by using the ARP command, perform the commands shown below.
     note:
    The <LAN-address> can be found on the LAN address label on the server or (top of) the tower; each pair of digits must be separated by a colon.
    Format:
    arp -s <IP-address> <LAN-address> temp ping <IP-address>
    Example:
    arp -s 192.124.138.80 00:60:b0:11:00:86 temp
    ping 192.124.138.80
    The host will return a message similar to “192.124.138.80 is alive,” indicating that the address has been set and that communication with the server is established.
    The arp -s command may vary between different systems. Some BSD-type systems expect the IP address (or host name) and LAN address in reverse order. IBM AIX systems require the additional argument ether for Ethernet networks. See the example below.
    Example:
    arp -s ether salesdept 00:60:b0:11:00:86 temp
     note:
    When you execute the ping command for the first time, the response time may be longer than usual. The ping command enables the server to assign itself the address. You may set (and change) the IP address using this method only in the approximately one half hour immediately following startup in the factory-default state. This inhibits accidental or unauthorized IP address changes after this period.
  2. Restart the server (cycle its power).
Windows and NetWare, editing the config.ini file
To assign the IP address by editing the config.ini file, you must first set up access to the server from a workstation on the network.
Use a text editor to open the config.ini file in the ServerProperties folder in the System folder on the server. Edit the InternetAddress parameter in the IP section.
 caution:
Make sure there is a space between the equal sign and the parameter value. All other spaces between names of parameters or values are ignored. Do not remove the [END] marker from the file. You must save the file and restart the server to activate the new settings. You can do this by setting the Restart parameter in the config.ini file to yes and saving the file. Instead of setting Restart in the file, you can save the file first and then switch the server’s power off, wait 10 seconds, and switch power on.
The new settings are ready for use when the server completes its restart.
UNIX, using RARP
To assign the IP address in UNIX by using RARP:
  1. Append the following entry to your LAN (MAC) address table, typically: /etc/ethers. The <LAN-address> can be found on the LAN address label on the server or (top of) the tower; each pair of digits must be separated by a colon.
    Format:
    <LAN-address>
    <host-name>
    Example:
    00:60:b0:11:00:86
    cdserv
  2. Make sure the host table and alias name databases are updated as required by your systems.
  3. Start the RARP daemon (if not already running); typically by using the command: rarpd -a
  4. Restart the server (cycle its power).
UNIX, using BOOTP
To assign the IP address in UNIX by using BOOTP:
  1. Obtain administrator privileges.
  2. Append the following entry to your boot table, typically: /etc/bootptab).
    Format:
    <hostname>:ht= <hardwaretype>:vm= <vendormagic>:\
    :ha= <LAN-address>:ip= <IP-address>:\
    :sm= <subnetmask>:gw= <gatewayfield>
    Example:
    cdserv:ht=ether:vm=rfc1048:\
    :ha=0060b0110086:ip=192.124.138.80:\
    :sm=255.255.255.0:gw=192.124.138.254
    Notes
    • hostname is the DNS host name.
    • The ht and vm fields must be entered exactly as in the example. For Ethernet, ht=ether.
    • In the ha field, for <LAN-address> use the address found on the server or (top of) the tower. As in the example, use no separators between its digits.
    • In the ip field, for <IP-address> use the IP address assigned by the network administrator.
    • The sm field (subnet mask) determines when the traffic should be sent through a router. For example, the normal class C mask is 255.255.255.0. The mask 0.0.0.0 indicates that automatic router sensing is used.
    • The gw field (default gateway or router address) identifies the router which is sent all traffic directed outside the local network (according to the subnet mask).
  3. Make sure the host table and alias name databases are updated as described below:
    If Using DNS or WINS Host Names:
    Obtain the unique host name from the network administrator. Then associate it with the HP CD/DVD-ROM server’s IP address on your DNS server, using the appropriate procedures for your server. Consult your network administrator or your system manuals.
     note:
    If you intend to use WINS, you must enable WINS when you configure your server later.
  4. Start the bootp daemon (if not already running), typically by using the command: bootpd -a
  5. Restart the server (cycle its power) to download the IP address, default gateway address, and subnet mask.
UNIX, using DHCP
To assign the IP address in UNIX by using DHCP:
  1. Obtain administrator privileges.
  2. Edit or create a scope in the DHCP manager of the DHCP daemon. The entries made in this scope should include:
    • Subnet mask
    • Default router Internet address
    • NetBIOS over TCP/IP name server Internet address(es)
    • NetBIOS over TCP/IP node type Node type: The server can act either as a B Node (WINS disabled), or as an H Node (WINS enabled).
    • NetBIOS over TCP/IP scope ID
    • Lease duration
  3. Activate the scope.
  4. DHCP must be left configured to the default of enabled.
Windows NT, using DHCP
To assign the IP address in Windows NT by using DHCP:
  1. Obtain administrator privileges.
  2. Install the DHCP service on an NT server.
  3. Open the DHCP Manager (in Administrative Tools).
  4. In the Server menu, use Add DHCP Server to Server List to enter the IP address of each DHCP server on the network.
  5. In the Scope menu for a specific server, select Create. Enter:
    • Range of IP addresses in a subnet that can be leased
    • Subnet mask for the address range
    • IP addresses to be excluded from the scope
    • Lease duration (can be defaulted)
    • Scope name
  6. Using the DHCP Options, configure the Default Gateway if the default 0.0.0.0 is not appropriate.
  7. Select Activate in the Scope menu.
Client access to discs
Methods for providing access
For TCP/IP networks, two methods for client workstations to access the server and its discs are possible.
  • A Web browser can be used for access once an IP address is assigned.
  • Clients can map drives to the server, a CD/DVD-ROM drive, or a particular disc on a drive.
HTTP, using a Web browser
The HP CD/DVD-ROM server supports HTTP over TCP/IP. This means that the server works as a Web server. To access the server’s Web page, you must first configure the server with an IP address as described in the section above: "Set the IP address for the server."
 note:
After you set up Web access to the server according to the procedure in that section, “Web (HTTP)” can be disabled and enabled in the server’s configuration; the default is enabled. See “Disabling access for other protocols” below.
The server can be accessed using any standard Web browser, such as Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer. The example here uses Internet Explorer.
  1. Start Internet Explorer.
  2. In the Address field, enter the URL of the server as:
    Format:
    http:// <IP-address>
    Example:
    http://192.124.138.80
    Alternatively, use the host name associated with the IP address and assigned to the server.
    You will see the initial server Web page, as shown below.
Figure : Initial server Web page
Click a disc to view a list of its contents. All users have access to this page under the File View tab. They can browse and access the discs listed according to access permissions set up by the administrator. You can disallow Web access to the discs by disabling the Enable access to volumes via Web browser (HTTP) setting.
Some discs contain an index.htm or index.html file that provides access to the disc contents on a Web page you can use with the browser. If you click such a disc, that Web page will appear in place of the simple list. However, you can see the simple list rather than the index page by adding /. after the location address.
For easy access to your server resources, Web pages can be saved in your Web browser.
  • Netscape Navigator: Bookmarks, Add Bookmark
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer: Favorites, Add Favorite
     note:
    Web browsers may save pages in local cache memory. In this case, if a disc in a drive is changed; returning to the File View will not show the changed disc. You must reload the Web page.
Mapping drives
An additional way to make the discs available to workstations on the network (clients) is the same as used with file servers: “mapping” the server to a drive letter on PC systems, or “mounting” on UNIX systems. After the server is mapped or mounted, the client accesses the server, with its discs (and optionally its configuration parameters), just like any other attached disk drive or networked file server.
The mapping or mounting procedure depends on the network operating environment and client system.
Configuring the server
By making configuration changes, you can customize server operation and can set access rights for security.
Configuration tips
Some IP configuration changes you might need are listed below. Some of these items are detailed in this document.
  • Set an IP address.
  • Set up or change the server name for NetWare or for Microsoft networking clients (SMB), or change the domain or workgroup name for SMB.
  • Set up a password or other access rights restrictions, some of which are specific to other networking and client protocols.
  • Disable server protocols, such as SMB on NetBIOS/NetBEUI, SMB on NetBIOS/TCP/IP, NetWare, and NFS, to prevent blanket access for protocols for which you have not restricted access.
  • Disable disc access through Web browsers.
  • Set up Internet and SNMP parameters.
  • Set the server’s time synchronization.
Methods for configuration
This document provides information for some of the configuration options, if they are general needs or relate specifically to TCP/IP networks. Configuration options specific to Microsoft networking, Novell NetWare, or UNIX/NFS are addressed in other documents.
HP recommends the Web method of configuration if a Web browser and IP and HTTP are available. Text editing is an alternative method.
Web browser configuration
After the initial server Web page is displayed, as shown in Figure 1 above, select the Quick Setup tab for most configuration needs. The first time during a session, you will be prompted to enter the username (default is root) and password (default is pass).
Figure : Quick Setup tab
You have the choice of a configuration wizard--click the Wizard icon--or detailed configuration settings--click the Detailed View. The wizard leads you through the most basic settings, and then restarts the server when you click the Finish button at the end. The detailed configuration includes all the settings, and when finished you must click the Restart Server button to effect most settings that change how the server appears on the network.
If you need help, click the ? button to display the online help. You can display a table of all configuration settings. Click the View Settings button on this Quick Setup page.
Some general settings for the server are done under the Administration tab instead. (Some of the settings below are examples.) When those settings are saved, they do not require restarting the server to take effect. The View Settings button is also available under the Administration tab.
Disabling access for other protocols
In the Detailed View (from the Quick Setup page), you can switch off all access to the server through other protocols for which you do not set up access restrictions.
Disable Microsoft Windows access by using the Windows (SMB) tab and disabling the NetBIOS Protocol Bindings for both NetBEUI and TCP/IP. Disable UNIX by using the UNIX tab and the Enable NFS setting. Disable NetWare by using the NetWare tab and the Enable NetWare setting.
 note:
Do not disable Web (HTTP) access. Maintain administrative access to the server through this Web interface.
You must restart the server to effect Detailed View settings.
TCP/IP and Web (HTTP) settings
The wizard for TCP/IP (from the Quick Setup page) allows you to set the correct subnet mask and default router to accompany the IP address. Clicking the wizard’s Finish button causes the server to restart for the settings to take effect.
You can enable WINS on the Detailed View setup page for TCP/IP, or in the wizard for TCP/IP.
The Detailed View setup page for Web (HTTP) allows you to disable all access to the volumes through this Web interface--the File View.
Server password
To protect the system files, it is important to change the server password. For example, users are prompted for the server password when trying to access the Administration and Quick Setup Web pages for the first time during a session. Under the Administration tab, click the This Server button and with the server module highlighted, click the Settings button. On the resulting page, select the General tab. Change and confirm the password. Click Save. This new password takes effect without restarting the server.
Automatic time synchronization
For automatic time synchronization you can use the Network Time Protocol (NTP, as defined by RFC 1769). Under the Administration tab, click the This Server button and with the server module highlighted, click the Settings button. On the resulting page, select the Date & Time tab. Select Automatically and network Time Protocol. Then for NTP Server, specify the IP address or Internet domain name of the time server.
Or you can use NetWare NDS Time Synchronization if your network runs NetWare.
Access rights: Web security
The HP CD/DVD-ROM server can be configured to restrict user access to CD/DVD-ROM drives, to individual discs, and to the server configuration. You can limit the number of users simultaneously accessing any disc to comply with user-license restrictions.
By networking protocols
Access restrictions can be set individually for each protocol (NetWare NCP, Windows SMB, UNIX NFS, and Web HTTP). The default settings in some protocols provide full access rights to all users, so we recommend that you implement at least two access restrictions:
  • Disable all protocols not being used. If unused protocols are not disabled, a user accessing the server through such a protocol may be given full access rights, regardless of the security configurations in other protocols. See “Disabling access for other protocols” above.
  • Restrict access to the root and System folders (see below).
By discs or drives
Access restrictions can be set individually for each CD/DVD-ROM drive, for each disc inserted into the drives, and for the server configuration files (in the System folder within the root), and for the volumes as a group (using the Volumes folder).
Set these access rights using the Web browser, under the Administration tab. Select the Discs and Drives button. In the Discs and file system view, you will see an icon in the Access Rights column for each of the discs and for the root and for the volumes folder. In the Drives view, you will see an icon in the Access Rights column for each CD/DVD-ROM drive. See Figure 3 below.
Click the Access Rights icon to display the Access Rights properties page for that access point.
Figure : Administration tab; discs and file system view
By drive
To associate the access sharing and access rights with the drive, for whatever disc is in the drive, rather than the specific disc, click Drive for Use the access rights and properties of the Drive.
Figure : Administration tab; drives view
Then the disc’s volume name will be changed to the default SCSI name, such as CD-id2lun0. You can change this name using the Name field on this property page. As a result, the icon in the Access Rights column will illustrate the key on top of a drive rather than a disc. (For HP J4150A: If this disc is then archived, the share name will revert to the disc’s volume name.)
Volume name and user limit
Under the General tab, you can set the disc’s volume name and the limit for the number of users simultaneously accessing the volume (for user-license restrictions). The volume has by default the name held on the disc itself. You can override the default name using the Name setting on this page.
 note:
Spaces in a volume name will be replaced by underscores. If the volume name duplicates another volume name, an underscore and capital-A (then underscore and capital-B, etc.) will be appended to the duplicate.
Password
Under the Web security tab, you can protect the volume using either the administrator’s Server Password or a separate password for the volume. These changes take effect as soon as you OK each page.
Security by network
If you use Windows NT domains or NetWare NDS, you also can set up access restrictions for those environments.

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